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Listening - Observation- Verification Worksheet

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LISTENING - OBSERVATION -VERIFICATION WORKSHEET

 

Effective communication with families requires careful listening (what we hear), observation (what we see), and verification (what we say) of information obtained through sensitive questions, restatements, invitations to expand and pauses.  Care must be taken in identifying specific, objective information free of personal attitudes or feelings.  Utilize the following worksheet  during the activity as a  guide.  Make notes of specific behaviors observed or information reported without making judgments about the information communicated.  Note how information was or could have been verified through what is said (e.g., questions, restatements, etc.).  Remember, further information from families may emerge based on the environment created and upon the extent and type relationship developed.    Again, be specific without embellishment.

 

COMMUNICATIVE INTERACTION

 

What You HEAR

Listen For:

What You SEE

Observe:

What You SAY

Verify:

Talking vs. Not Talking

  • Amount
  • Interruptions
  • Pregnant Pauses
  • Changes in Tone, Pitch, Fluency (connected vs. disconnected)
  • Pacing of comments, questions and responses
  • Identification of issues
  • Idea or solution generation
  • Negotiation of strategies for solutions

Nonverbal vs. No Observable Behaviors

  • Eye Contact (Between Speaker & Listener)
  • Facial Expressions (e.g., smile, grimace, opens eyes wide/closes eyes)
  • Body Gestures (e.g., movement toward or away) and Postures (e.g., slouching, sitting erect, leaning towards/away)

What was Heard

  • “Did I hear you correctly when you said ______?”
  • “I noticed a change in the (tone, pitch, rate, fluency) of your voice when  you talked about ______.”

 

What Was Seen

  • “ I noticed you do not look at _____ when you/when _____ is talking.”
  • “ I noticed a smile on your face as you talked about _______”. 

 

NATURE OF THE CONCERN

 

What You HEAR

Listen For:

What You SEE

Observe:

What You SAY

Verify:

Content vs. Interpretation Information

  • Specific Details regarding health and development through Family Stories & Examples
  • Natural History Surrounding the Concern
  • Source of information
  • Each person’s Perception or Interpretation of the concern
  • Questions & Responses
  • Changing the Subject

 

 

Signs of Concern vs. No Concern

  • Changes in Facial Expressions while speaking or listening to stated concern(s)
  • Eye Contact (amount, frequency, type) while listening or speaking about the concern
  • Body Gestures and Posturing during discussion about the concern(s)

What was Heard

  • “ In other words, the concern about your child has to do with ______.”
  • “Tell me more about ______.”
  • “What does it mean when I hear __________.”

    

What Was Seen

  • “ I noticed a change in your facial expression when _____ was being discussed.  Is this a concern?”
  • “ It appeared that every time the mention of _____ was brought up,  there was a change in how much eye contact.”

FAMILY STRUCTURE & INTERACTION

 

What You HEAR

Listen For:

What You SEE

Observe:

What You SAY

Verify:

Family Members

Present vs. Absent

  • Who is reported present or included in the family?
  • Who is reported absent or excluded from the family?

  

Family Roles

Assigned vs. Assumed

  • Who is the Assigned vs.  Assumed: homemaker, chauffeur, organizer, decision-maker, spokes-person, etc.? 
  • Discrepancies between Assigned vs. Assumed Roles
  • Are Roles Shared or Mutually Exclusive?

Patterns of Interaction

(adult to adult; adult to child; child to child;)

  • Observe  Eye Contact, Facial Expressions, Body Gestures & Postures for:
  • Directiveness (control of interaction through verbal & nonverbal behavior; following the lead)
  • Turn-taking
  • Responsiveness
  • Attentiveness

 

What was Heard

  • Do I understand what you mean about who is part of the family when I say ______?”
  • “ Do I hear a discrepancy between who is assigned and who assumes the role of ______?”

 

What Was Seen

  • “ I noticed when you paused and maintained eye contact, your child _____.”
  • “ It appears that you direct the situation by doing ________.  Is that observation accurate?”

  

 

LISTENING - OBSERVING - VERIFYING

PARENTS/CAREGIVERS AND YOUNG CHILDREN TOGETHER

    

Understanding of the interactional relationship between parents, caregivers and young children requires careful listening (what we hear), observation (what we see), and verification of verbal and nonverbal information (what we say) through sensitive questions, restatements, invitations to expand, and pauses.  Care must be taken in identifying specific, objective information free of personal attitudes or feelings.  Utilize the following worksheet  during the activity as a  guide.  Make notes of specific behaviors observed or information reported without making judgments about the information communicated.  Note how information was or could have been verified through what is said (e.g., questions, restatements, etc.).  Remember, further information from families may emerge based on the environment created and upon the extent and type relationship developed.    Again, be specific without embellishment.

 

INITIATION VS. RESPONSE

 

What You HEAR

Listen For:

What You SEE

Observe:

What You SAY

Verify:

Content of Information

 

  • Changes in Eye Contact, Attentiveness, Activity Level, Vocalizations or Verbalizations
  • Physical Approach/Withdrawal

 

What was Heard

  • “I heard  a pause as if to give an opportunity for turn-taking.  Is that correct?”
  • “I heard you offer choices about ____.”

What Was Seen

  • “ I noticed when you paused and maintained eye contact, your child _____.”
  • It appears that the situation is directed by  ________.  Is that observation accurate?”
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