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Fourth Grade Language Arts Curriculum

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THE PHILLIPS-OSBORNE SCHOOL CURRICULUM

Teacher:  

Grade:  4

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Practice writing strands of persuasive, informative, descriptive, narratives, letter, explanatory, the basic report, and a good paragraph with main ideas and details

Implemented by using a series of novels.  Introduces various genres and provides opportunities for critical thinking, character analogies, and comprehension emphasizing individual research and reports.

Integrated with all areas of study at this level.

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Incorporate reading and writing in all subject areas

Skills in sentence structure, writing friendly and business letters, descriptive and persuasive paragraphs and research techniques.

Reading is literature based.  Novels and other selections are coordinated with the study of the United States culture, geography, and history.  Study and research skills are emphasized.

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Grammar study is a part of the writing process, includes intro to parts of speech and how to properly use them in writing

Emphasis on refining writing, especially paragraph writing.

Writing process to refine paragraph writing and combine paragraphs into coherent essays.

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Literature connections are strong in this grade Teachers continue to read aloud

Correct grammar and mechanics skills

Correct spelling, grammar, and mechanics are stressed in all written work.

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Spelling includes the study of patterns and rules, mastery of high frequency word lists and student selected words

Spelling continues the four components introduced in third grade: study of patterns and rules, words of the specific disciplines, high frequency words and student selected words.  Students are expected to spell the high frequency words correctly throughout their work

Spelling continues to build knowledge of rules and patterns, of high frequency words, words specific to an academic discipline and words of interest to student

LANGUAGE

ARTS

Attends weekly assemblies, prepares and presents a poem at assembly

At weekly assembly, students practice their listening and speaking skills.  Each retells an Aesop’s fable at assembly

Oldest students in assembly, students often serve as leaders.  Recitation at assembly is highlight of public speaking experience - students have opportunities to develop competence and independence in speaking, listening, reading and writing

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

MATHEMATICS

Develop problem solving, use strategies and practice computational skills of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.  Place values through millions

Focus on problem solving, concentrating on the inquiry method of learning.

Includes reading, writing, adding, subtracting and multiplying fractions and decimals, relating fractions to decimals and finding factors and multiples of numbers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

MATHEMATICS

Introduced to decimals.  Continue study of fractions including fractions of sets and whole numbers

Emphasis on following concepts: reading and writing numbers to the hundred millions, multiplying one to four digit numbers by one and two digit multiples; dividing one to five digit numbers by one and two digit divisors; using fractions in measurement and sets of objects;

Basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division are practiced and applied in problem solving activities.  Uses numbers through the billions, estimate products and quotients, and use mental math to solve problems both individually and in a group

MATHEMATICS

 

adding and subtracting fractions with like denominators; finding area perimeter of various shapes using whole number measurements, measuring to the nearest 1/2 inch; estimating and exploring probability and statistics

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

COMPUTER

Promote computer literacy and enable students to use technology to enhance their learning.

Promote computer literacy and enable students to use technology to enhance their learning.

Promote computer literacy and enable students to use technology to enhance their learning.

COMPUTER

Build upon the computer skills introduced earlier..  Word processing is integrated into the writing process.  Desktop publishing enables them to create simple newspapers and other publications.

Build upon the computer skills introduced earlier.  Word processing is integrated into the writing process.  Desktop publishing enables them to create simple newspapers and other publications.

Build upon the computer skills introduced earlier.  Word processing is integrated into the writing process.  Desktop publishing enables them to create simple newspapers and other publications.

COMPUTER

Curriculum based research is enhanced as students learn to use multimedia tools such as CD ROM’s. 

Curriculum based research is enhanced as students learn to use multimedia tools such as CD ROM’s. 

Curriculum based research is enhanced as students learn to use multimedia tools such as CD ROM’s. 

COMPUTER

Gain an increasing familiarity and exposure to current hardware and software capabilities

Gain an increasing familiarity and exposure to current hardware and software capabilities

Gain an increasing familiarity and exposure to current hardware and software capabilities

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

SCIENCE

Learning through exploring and discovery.  Study living things including growth, needs, evolution, and extinction.

Combines life, physical, and earth sciences through a hands on science program.  Plants, animals, and their relationships are studied with emphasis on propagation and photosynthesis.  The properties of matter, the oceans of the earth and air and water are investigated

Investigations incorporate life, physical and earth science through the inquiry method.  Plant identification, historical research connected to Native American studies and environmental issues are interrelated.

SCIENCE

Other units of study: simple machines, systems of the sky, geology unit “The Earth Beneath Your Feet”

Good health habits are emphasized as a part of the health education program

The forms of energy are investigated with special emphasis given to electrical energy.  Sound and light are explored.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

SCIENCE

Create replicas of the human body to learn about body structure and functions.  Study nutrition in greater depth

 

Outdoor education program starts, emphasizes environmental studies.  Health education includes drug resistance education (DARE), personal growth, development, and sex education (Art of Personal Living)

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

LIBRARY

Children are scheduled for 45 minutes a week of instruction in library science.  Activities include learning how the library is organized and how to access information in printed as well as electronic sources.

Children are scheduled for 45 minutes a week of instruction in library science.  Activities include learning how the library is organized and how to access information in printed as well as electronic sources.

Children are scheduled for 45 minutes a week of instruction in library science.  Activities include learning how the library is organized and how to access information in printed as well as electronic sources.

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

MUSIC

Continue with two music lessons weekly, which include the addition of instruction on the recorder

Maintain the twice weekly music schedule but may elect to add band to their schedule.  The bands perform during the second semester.  The Cleveland Orchestra is included at this grade level

Maintain the twice weekly music schedule but may elect to add band to their schedule.  The bands perform during the second semester.  The Cleveland Orchestra is included at this grade level

MUSIC

 

Become more proficient in the skills of recognizing and performing musical notation, playing or singing melodies and developing techniques of choral singing

Become more proficient in the skills of recognizing and performing musical notation, playing or singing melodies and developing techniques of choral singing

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

THE VISUAL ARTS

Students are encouraged to develop not only self-expression but critical awareness and a sense of personal achievement.

Students are encouraged to develop not only self-expression but critical awareness and a sense of personal achievement.

Students are encouraged to develop not only self-expression but critical awareness and a sense of personal achievement.

THE VISUAL ARTS

 

 

Mechanics of design emphasizing one point perspective is introduced.

THE VISUAL ARTS

 

 

Basic skills are stressed with an emphasis on realism while still promoting creativity.  A variety of media is introduced and used.

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Emphasis on fair play and ethical behavior reinforces the importance of self-discipline and conscientious effort.

Emphasis on fair play and ethical behavior reinforces the importance of self-discipline and conscientious effort.

Emphasis on fair play and ethical behavior reinforces the importance of self-discipline and conscientious effort.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Experiences stress understanding of the skills of movement, competency in movement, and development of positive attitudes and behaviors that lead to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Experiences stress understanding of the skills of movement, competency in movement, and development of positive attitudes and behaviors that lead to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Learning experiences stress understanding of the skills of movement, competency in movement, and development of positive attitudes and behaviors that lead to a healthy, active lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Skill development includes running, jumping, galloping, skipping, hopping, catching, throwing, kicking, striking, and dodging.  Students begin to develop mature form in these skills and learn to control their movements and make smooth transitions from one movement to another.

Skill development includes running, jumping, galloping, skipping, hopping, catching, throwing, kicking, striking, and dodging.  Students begin to develop mature form in these skills and learn to control their movements and make smooth transitions from one movement to another.

Skill development includes running, jumping, galloping, skipping, hopping, catching, throwing, kicking, striking, and dodging.  Students begin to develop mature form in these skills and learn to control their movements and make smooth transitions from one movement to another.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Health and safety are important components of the program.  Encouraged to develop skills that will maintain a heath enhancing level of physical fitness and lead to a physically active lifestyle.  Cooperation is stressed.  Students learn to exhibit responsible personal and social behavior.

As students move into fourth and fifth grades, they begin to develop proficiencies in a few specialized movement forms and they can identify the activities that they enjoy.

As students move into fourth and fifth grades, they begin to develop proficiencies in a few specialized movement forms and they can identify the activities that they enjoy.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Opportunity to learn basic swimming skills that promote water safety and enjoyment.

Health and safety are important components of the program.  Encouraged to develop skills that will maintain a heath enhancing level of physical fitness and lead to a physically active lifestyle.  Cooperation is stressed.  Students learn to exhibit responsible personal and social behavior.

Health and safety are important components of the program.  Encouraged to develop skills that will maintain a heath enhancing level of physical fitness and lead to a physically active lifestyle.  Cooperation is stressed.  Students learn to exhibit responsible personal and social behavior.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Opportunity to learn basic swimming skills that promote water safety and enjoyment.

Opportunity to learn basic swimming skills that promote water safety and enjoyment.

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

FRENCH

Students learn new songs, rhymes, simple dialogues and telling time

Goals are to build the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing, to continue an appreciation of French culture, and to introduce the structure of the French language

Goals are to build the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing, to continue an appreciation of French culture, and to introduce the structure of the French language

FRENCH

New vocabulary words pertaining to animals, food, the body, and the classroom are learned

Simple conversations include greetings, self identification, and questioning skills.  The French alphabet songs, and nursery rhymes are integrated into the total curriculum

Simple conversations include greetings, self identification, and questioning skills.  The French alphabet songs, and nursery rhymes are integrated into the total curriculum

FRENCH

Some words are presented in print to prepare students for future skill development in reading and writing

 

 

 

 

 

 

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

SOCIAL STUDIES

Begins a two year introduction to world cultures.

Continues two year study of world cultures as students focus on the geographical attribute of the world

Emphasizes the culture of the United States.  History, geography, and current events are intertwined in this study to understand how people live and prosper in different regions.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Learn about children and communities in Africa, Egypt, China and Australia

The regions studied, are mountains, island, deserts, tropics, grasslands, and polar regions

Ohio history receives a special emphasis since it is the home state of the students

SOCIAL STUDIES

Critical thinking is encouraged as they compare and contrast life in various world communities with life in their own community

Map and globe skills are studied along with the accompanying environmental issues

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Reading, skits, art investigations, and projects enable students to understand different ways of life

Also, grade is mini society.  This interdisciplinary unit is to stimulate the conditions of an economic society based on free enterprise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

AREA

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

STORY BOARD

DIANE VAN HIMBERGEN

Reading is for gaining information, as well as enjoyment

Respect for others, their feelings, possessions and space

Words hurt as much as sticks and stones

World does not involve around them

Numbers are more just facts, they are everywhere

Writing is a way to communicate:

letters

stories

notes

It is okay to have their own opinion

Actions have consequences: cause and affect

Relationships between people and nature

More than one solution to a problem

It is okay to ask questions

It is okay not to understand

Patterns are everywhere:

years

months

time

seasons

length of day

 

CAROLYN

HOLMES

Reason, respect, and responsibility

Develop cooperative learning skills

Learn about feelings and emotions

Learn to work independently

Develop listening skills: oral and written

Develop problem-solving skills:  more then one way to solve a problem, more then one solution, real life problems

Find patterns, shapes, numbers everywhere

Develop logical thinking skills and critical thinking skills

 

MARCIA BROWN

Reason, respect, and responsibility.

Do unto to others as you would have them do unto you.  Become independent thinkers and organized citizens.

Become life-long readers.

Use the dictionary and resources to improve reading comprehension.

Become aware of the different regions of the world and know the difference in the climates, natural features, resources, cultures, plants, animals, technology, needs, and wants.

Write good sentences using different parts of speech; noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun.

To become proficient in writing, narrative, persuasive, descriptive, and informative.

To write poetry, haiku, and equatrains.

Write a one page research report using at least two sources.  Followed patterns compute using all four math operations.

Go toy shopping by using money.  Make sense out of numbers.  Read and use a calendar.  Tell time, lapse time and life in time.

 

SALLIE MARLOW

Creation of environment conducive to positive image.

Development of critical thinking and communication skills through writing and oral presentations.

Exploration of fundamental concepts, patterns, and problem-solving techniques in our number system.

Awareness of interdependence of science, math and technology

Introduction of physical and life science through hands-on experimentation

Enrichment of reading skills through exposure to a variety of genre with trade books. 

Development of cooperative learning skills

DONNA ARROWSMITH

The fifth grade uses a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the five themes of geography as they relate to the five regions of the US: northeast, southwest, midwest, southeast and west.  What is learned shows connections to the environment and knowledge emphasizes conceptual understanding.  Skills focus on a full range of successes, higher level thinking and communication skills which encourage life long learning

Attitudes and values of different time periods involve analysis and clarification rather than acceptance of a particular  set of attitudes and values.  Behavior as it influences others and the earth emphasizes responsible actions for today and the future.  Ideas investigated are applied to life and values in society.  Open ended inquiry, a hands-on, mind-on, approach to most problem solving, decision making, reasoning, and creative thinking.  Learners centered learning which uses cooperative and collaborative learning in whole group, small group, and individual learning focuses on learning outcomes.

 

The diverse needs of individuals are taken in to account of considering multiple intelligences, different learning styles and the developmental needs of the whole person.

 

Reference:  Integrating environmental education and science developed by the Environmental Education Council of Ohio.

 

LISA SHEFFIELD

 

Success criteria of a Phillips-Osborne education in acting and modeling the principles of democracy in the classroom. 

Experimental inductive and hands-on learning in a cooperative, collaborative environment. 

Challenge students to think, grow, and allow themselves to self-reflect and self-critique. 

Develop critical thinking skills to cultivate independence and expression through experimental and successful adaptation in real life situations.  Become more active and informed citizens to bring about a constructive social change.

Authentic multi-tiered learning and holistic inquiry in social and cognitive contexts.

Ability to write effectively.

Grammar - organization, cohesive argument.  Ability to speak articulately and effectively in social situations.  Ability to select and use appropriate old and new tools.

Technology for problem solving, know how to critically assess sources of information and to make contact with the rest of the world through the computer.  Ability to reason - make logical conclusions based on a body of data.

Executive ability - e.g. ability to identify a task or goal, to find a strategy, coordinate resources, see through to completion.

Belief based as least in part on experience that service to the community is an essential part of life.

Recognize that attitude impacts others and act responsibly.

Confidence to take the risk of challenging themselves to develop and excel.

Integrate all the intelligences and adopt a positive attitude toward learning.  That it is enjoyable, practical, meaningful, purposeful, and important throughout life.

 

 


 

GRADE THREE:

 

Composition

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to recognize complete sentence.

To be able to recognize a complete paragraph.

To be able to recognize a topic sentence and supporting detail.

To be able to plan ideas for a story.

To be able to recognize different forms of paragraphs.

To be able to research a report using factual information.

To be able to proofread written work.

To be able to write a final copy of written work.

To be able to recognize forms of poetry.

To be able to recognize correct forms of letters and messages.

 

 

Skills:

 

To be able to:

Write a complete sentence.

Write a complete paragraph using a topic sentence and supporting ideas.

Brainstorming ideas for stories.

Write various forms of paragraphs and stories.

To write a simple report using factual information.

Correct mistakes in a written work.

Write various forms of poetry.

Write letters, thank you notes and messages in correct form.

 

Grammar

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to recognize the function of a noun.

To be able to recognize people and common nouns.

To be able to recognize the function of a verb.

To be able to recognize verb forms and auxiliaries.

To be able to recognize correct verb usage.

To be able to recognize correct capitalization and punctuation in a sentence.

To be able to recognize when to use quotation marks.

To be able to begin to recognize noun substitutes, adjectives, and adverbs in a sentence.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Write sentences, paragraphs and stories using correct forms of nouns and verbs.

Use proper punctuation in written work.

Use proper capitalization in written work.

Use quotation marks in written work.

 

Handwriting

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to review manuscript writing.

To be able to be aware of correct formation of cursive letters.

To be able to be aware of correct formation of cursive letters using spacing and correct slant.

To be able to be aware of correct formation on numerals from 1 to 100.

To be able to be aware of correct posture to write and correct handling of writing tool.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Print the alphabet in upper and lower case using the D’Nealian Method.

Write the alphabet in cursive using the D’Nealian Method.

Write numerals 1 - 100 using the D’Nealian Method.

Use correct spacing and slant when cursively writing.

Correctly hold writing tool and sit with good posture.

 

 

Reading

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to understand main idea and recall details in a paragraph or story.

To be able to understand plot, characterization, setting and mood of a paragraph or story.

To be able to make inferences and draw conclusions.

To be able to distinguish different types of literature.

To be able to predict outcomes and understand cause and effect.

To be able to read for information.

To promote a positive attitude toward reading.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Identify words unfamiliar in form and pronunciation.

Find the meaning of words using context clues, glossary, and dictionary skills.

Use base words and change form by adding -s, -es, prefixes and suffixes.

Use and distinguish synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, compound words and contractions.

Divide works between syllables.

 

Speaking and Listening Skills

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to follow oral directions.

To be able to read orally and speak aloud so that small groups and class can hear and understand what is being said.

To be able to write words and sentences that are orally dictated.

To be able to participate in individual and group program performances activities.

 

Skills:

 

To ability to:

Develop oral reading skills in the areas of volume, speed, pronunciation, posture, and expression for classroom participation.

Restate oral directions in student’s own words.

Use knowledge of grammar and spelling skills to orally repeat aloud, then write words and sentences.

Develop oral speaking skills in the areas of volume, speed, pronunciation, posture, and expression for presentation of play and choral reading.

Participate as a member of an audience during school programs and field trips.

 

 

Spelling

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to use working knowledge of spelling rules to sound out and write words in written language.

To add spelling list words to their written vocabulary.

To apply skills learned in weekly lessons to recognize and write unfamiliar words.

To promote a positive attitude toward correct spelling usage and tools such as skimming, proofreading, and use of dictionary to attain correct spelling usage.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Use different spelling patterns for long and short vowels.

Use base words and make plural forms by adding -s, and -es in written language.

Use base words and add prefixes and suffixes to change the meaning of a word in a sentence.

Begin to use irregular plural forms correctly in written language.

Begin to use the apostrophe correctly in singular and plural possessive forms of written words.

Begin using and spelling correctly words with more than three syllables.

Use a glossary and dictionary to find the correct spelling of a word or to correct the misspelling of a word.

Spell correctly words containing consonants and consonant blends.

Begin using and spell correctly words containing silent letters such as kn / n / wr /r.

Use homophones, compound words, contractions and proper nouns correctly in written language.

Write words and sentences which are orally dictated.

 

 

GRADE FOUR

 

Composition

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to understand the concept of the sentence, focusing on the sentence as the basic unit of communication.

To be able to understand the concept of a paragraph reinforcing that it is a group of sentences that tell about the same idea.

To be able to communicate through written messages.

To be able to understand the step-by-step development of a report.

To be able to write a variety of stories including true stories, fantasy, and fables.

To be able to write poetry and plays including cinquain poems, quatrain poems, free verse poems, skits.

To be able to edit, revise, and proofread as a coordinated activity with each objective and skill.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Write simple and compound subjects and predicates.

Write  declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences.

Write a compound sentence by using conjunctions as “and,” “or,” and “but.”

Write a topic sentence for a paragraph.

Arrange details in a paragraph in logical order.

Connect sentences in a paragraph using direct and indirect links.

Write narrative, descriptive, and explanatory paragraphs.

Organize information by topics.

Write a friendly letter, and invitation response, an envelope address, journal and diary entries, newspaper advertisements, directions for a game of play, and take notes on oral messages.

Limit a report topic, use an encyclopedia, use a card catalog, and take notes for a report.

Organize information for a report, make a report outline, and write a report including a bibliography.

Write a book report.

Write story settings, write about characters, write conversation that makes characters seem real.

Begin a story, develop a story, and end a story.

Use simile in poetry.

Plan a skit and write dialogue in skit.

 

Grammar

 

Objectives:

To be able to develop the concept of the sentence

To be able to learn written composition skills centered around conversation

To be able to identify nouns, pronouns, and adjectives and recognize them in sentences

To be able to learn content and form appropriate to two types of letters:  business and friendly

To be able to identify verbs and adverbs through function and form

To be able to understand how to use a dictionary and what help it can offer

To be able to learn a step-by-step development of a report

To be able to reinforce the rules of capitalization, punctuation, and grammatical usage

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

recognize subject - predicate structure of English sentences in N-V and N-V-N sentence patterns

recognize and write different kinds of sentences:  declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory

use paragraphing, quotation marks, and other punctuation marks, and capitalization in written composition centered about conversation

recognize definition, the function of subject and direct object, noun forms, proper nouns and their capitalization to help identify nouns in sentences

understand the function and use of pronouns

understand the function and position of adjectives plus the value of this part of speech to enliven composition

write interesting and suitable content in friendly and punctuation, abbreviations, conventional greetings and closings, and addressing of envelopes

learn the position a verb occupies in sentences and identify verbs through their plain, past, singular, and -ing forms and definition

understand the function of adverbs as modifiers of verbs giving attention to the form of adverbs with the -ly suffix and the fact that adverbs do not hold one set position in a sentence

quickly and efficiently locate entries, prefixes, suffixes, and abbreviations in a dictionary and to understand and find homographs

use a dictionary to find meanings, pronunciations, spellings, parts of speech, and synonyms

limit a report topic, use an encyclopedia, use a card catalog, and take notes for a report

organize information for a report, make a report outline, write a report including a bibliography

proofread to reinforce rules of capitalization, punctuation, and grammatical usage

 

 

Handwriting

 

Objectives:

 

to be able to provide a handwriting system that stresses flexibility, legibility and individuality of writing

to be able to learn to express one’s ideas at the highest possible level

to be able to practice and refine the skills of cursive and manuscript writing

to be able to use handwriting in language arts

to be able to use handwriting in correspondence

to be able to increase speed of handwriting

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

learn the alphabet in upper and lower case manuscript and cursive with arrows to indicate the stroke sequence

strengthen the kinesthetic and visual skills that eliminate many of the common blicks to learning to read

to practice correct position of writing instrument, paper and body

 

 

Reading

 

Objectives:

 

to be able to identify and recognize words

to be able to understand what is read

to be able to read for information

to be able to provide breadth of appreciation of learning through reading

to be able to stimulate interest in reading for pleasure

to be able to provide an understanding of different types of literature

 

Skills:

 

the ability to:

identify words unfamiliar in form

identify words unfamiliar in pronunciation

get word meanings

get meanings of phrases and special expressions

get meanings from syntactic and rhetorical relationships, and using punctuation marks

follow directions and draw conclusions

locate, organize, evaluate and retain information

improve study skills (S, O, R, R, R)

recognize types of literature

identify story elements

understand writing styles and elements

 

Speaking and Listening Skills

 

Objectives:

 

to be able to increase oral and listening communication skills

to be able to learn to express one’s ideas at the highest level

to be able to develop students’ speaking vocabulary and dictation

 

Skills:

 

the ability to:

read loudly enough for all to hear

pronounce words clearly

hold your head up so the audience can see your face, and hold the book down so it doesn’t block your voice

look at the audience as often as you can without losing your place

keep your eyes moving across the page ahead of your voice

adjust voice and reading rate to the mood of the story

summarize directions in the students own words

read conversation, narration and informational materials aloud

take notes on oral messages and classroom lectures

 

Spelling:

 

Objectives:

 

to be able to learn the various spellings for the different sounds in the English language of words and irregular words

to be able to understand spelling generalizations relating to inflected endings, prefixes, suffixes, compound words, contractions, and syllables

to be able to use spelling list words to enhance language and thinking skills

to be able to develop and reinforce dictionary skills and handwriting skills

to be able to reinforce high utility words as they apply to spelling generalizations taught in various lessons

to enrich spelling and vocabulary skills through the presentation of challenge words relating to different subject areas

 

Skills:

 

the ability to:

listen to a word’s sounds and note it’s spelling patterns

learn irregular spellings and word histories

use spelling words to write sentences and paragraphs

complete word-sort activities that promote the thinking skills of comparing, classifying, and categorizing

practice spelling patterns while reinforcing meanings of words

use spelling words to develop critical thinking skills by classifying, comparing, generalizing, making inferences, and completing analogies

learn key skills in the conventions of written language through proofreading activities in capitalization, punctuation, and misspelling

use dictionary skills to become independent learners

practice handwriting skills to improve formation of letters and words

 

 

GRADE  -  FIVE

 

Composition

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to write a sentence, using subjects and predicates.

To be able to develop and write a paragraph using a topic sentence / main idea and sub-topic sentences.

To be able to learn to write stories, such as fantasy, mystery, biographies and non-fiction using and introduction, rising action, climax and a conclusion.

To be able to write poetry, including haiku’s, cinquains, free verse.

To be able to plan and develop the various steps in writing book reports, compositions, non-fiction reports and a research paper by learning the format of an outline note cards and a rough draft.

To be able to proofread, edit and revise each of the above objectives.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

write simple and compound subjects and predicates in sentences

write declarative, interrogative, commanding and exclamatory sentences

use adjectives and adverbs to make sentences more interesting

join sentences by making complex or compound sentences using “and”, “or”, or “but”

use phrases to expand sentences

edit sentences

write a topic sentence for a paragraph

write a paragraph in proper sequence

write a descriptive paragraph

write a paragraph to compare or contrast

write paragraphs that give an opinion, explain, prove, or convince

revise a paragraph

to write a story/composition about characters, using dialogue, tall tales, mysteries, biographies, fantasies

begin, develop and end a story

write a report or research paper using encyclopedias, card catalog, bibliography

organize information for a report by writing an outline, note taking and rough draft

write a book report.

write a friendly letter, business letter, invitation and/or response, thank you letter, newspaper advertisement, directions for a recipe, address an envelope.

write poetry in free verse, cinquains, and haiku’s.

Paraphrase when taking notes.

 

Grammar

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to identify sentences and fragments.

To be able to distinguish between an antonym, synonym, homonym, compound work and contraction.

To be able to identify nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, articles, and prepositions in a sentence.

To be able to be able to identify subjects, predicates, and objects in a sentence.

To be able to develop an agreement between the subject and predicate.

To be able to distinguish the differences between singular, plural, and possessive.

To be able to review the rules of capitalization and punctuation (including use of quotation marks), apostrophes, and contractions.

To be able to identify a prepositional phrase.

To be able to understand how to use a dictionary and thesaurus, and to see the values in using these.

To be able to reinforce the use of context clues to develop vocabulary skills.

 

Skills:

 

Recognize the four kinds of sentences: declarative, interrogative, imperative and exclamatory.

Recognize the subject – predicate pattern of N-V, N-V-N, N-LV-N, N-LV-Adj.

Recognize the function of subject, direct object, indirect object and proper nouns to help identify various kinds of nouns in a sentence.

Understand the function and use of pronouns, both as subjects and direct objects.

Understand the function of a verb in a sentence, in a predicate, and  in various tenses.

Understand the function of an adjective, predicate adjective, comparative adjective, superlative adjective and their uses in enlivening sentences, paragraphs and compositions.

Understand the function of adverbs as modifiers of verbs, recognize that many end in an –ly form, have a comparative and superlative form, can modify adjectives and other adverbs, and can be positioned almost anywhere in a sentence.

Locate dictionary entries especially when given another form of the word besides the root word.

Identify parts of speech through the dictionary, as well as meaning pronunciations, spellings and synonyms.

Identify information in an encyclopedia, using key words, alphabetical order, volume number, and guide words.

Identify prepositions, objects of prepositions, and prepositional phrases in a sentence.

Distinguish between prepositions and adverbs.

Identify conjunctions in a compound/complex sentence, in compound subjects or compound predicates.

Identify and correct run-on sentences.

Organize information for a report using an outline, notecards, rough draft and final copy including a bibliography.

Proofread to reinforce rules of capitalization, punctuation, and word usage.

Write interesting friendly, business and thank you letters using correct capitalization, punctuation, abbreviations, greetings, closings, and addressing of envelopes.

 

Reading

 

Objectives:

 

To be able to derive the main idea and locate specific information.

To be able to relate to ideas in a sentence.

To be able to summarize materials and relates outcomes.

To be able to evaluate material and relate events in a story.

To be able to understand details and make comparisons.

To be able to infer the authors’ meaning and answers factual question.

To be able to discuss character development.

To be able to distinguish fact from fantasy.

To be able to read for retention.

To be able to read for enjoyment.

To be able to appreciate poetry.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Understand word meanings.

Understand meanings of phrase and special expressions.

Understand meanings from syntactic and rhetorical relationships.

Use punctuation marks and typographical variations as meaning aids.

Comprehension application.

Follow directions.

Noting and remembering important details.

Note correct sequence.

Identify the topic and the main idea of a paragraph or longer passage.

Draw conclusions.

Make inferences.

Predict outcomes.

Recognize cause and effect.

Visualize.

Categorize.

Understand types of literature.

Understand types of story elements.

Understand writing styles and devices.

Use the library and special reference sources.

Locate and use information within books.

Evaluate information.

Organize information for retention and/or reporting.

Identify and recognize words in unfamiliar form.

Identify and recognize words unfamiliar in form and in pronunciation.

 

Speaking and Listening

 

Objectives:

 

Spelling units.

To be able to understand vowel rules.

Compound words and contractions.

Prefixes and suffixes.

Synonyms, antonyms, homonyms.

Syllables and plurals.

To be able to understand root words and derivatives.

To be able to use a dictionary.

To be able to read expressively – good phrasing – both prose and poetry.

To be able to choral speaking dramatizations.

To be able to deliver a speech effectively.

To be able to participate in discussions.

To be able to recite poetry.

 

Skills:

 

The ability to:

Persuade (oral reports – panel discussions).

Compare and contrast (oral reports and group discussions).

Inform (oral reports and group discussions).

Evaluate facts and opinions (oral reports and group discussions).

Appreciate others thoughts (oral reports and group discussions).

 


 

ECONOMICS CURRICULUM

 

THIRD GRADE

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

Concepts:

Scarcity Obj 1,8

Goods and Services Obj 2-7

Trade-offs and Opportunity Cost Obj 9,10,11

Producers and Consumers Obj 12

“Productivity” Obj 13

Exchange, Money and Interdependence Obj 14-17

Market and Prices Obj 18

“Competition” and Market Structure Obj 19

Role of Government Obj 20

 

Objectives:

  1. The student can identify and distinguish between wants and needs.
  2. The student can distinguish between goods and services.
  3. The student can identify which workers provide goods which provide services.
  4. The student will identify that productive resources (factors of production) are all natural resources, human resources, and human-made resources used to produce goods and services.
  5. The student will identify natural resources (also collectively referred to as “land”) are “gifts of nature”, they are present without human intervention.
  6. The student will identify that human resources (also called labor) represent the quantity and quality of human effort directed toward producing goods and services.
  7. Capital resources are goods made by people and used to produce other goods and services.
  8. The student will be able to explain scarcity requires people to make choices about using goods and services.
  9. The student will understand that when one chooses a good or service, another must be given up.
  10. The student will identify opportunity cost as the highest valued alternative that must be foregone because another option is chosen.
  11. The student will recognize that an opportunity cost is incurred whenever someone makes a personal decision to use limited resources (i.e., an economic decision).
  12. The student will distinguish between producers and consumers.
  13. The student will identify specialization as the division of labor into parts of a task to be managed by one worker.  (Community centered - baker, carpenter, doctor, etc.)
  14. The student can identify exchange as trading goods and services with people for other goods and services or money.
  15. The student will understand that people exchange goods and services voluntarily because they expect to be better off after the exchange.
  16. The student will define barter as the direct trading of goods and services between people.
  17. The student will recognize the role of money in an economy - a medium of exchange.  (Refer to Grade 2)
  18. The student will recognize that a market exists whenever buyers and sellers exchange goods and services.
  19. The student will identify that a market is a setting where buyers and sellers establish prices for identical or very similar products.
  20. The student will identify that some goods and services are provided by the government.
  21. The student will be able to verbalize the meaning of appropriate economic terms.

 

Concepts:

Scarcity Obj 1 - 4

Opportunity Cost and Trade-offs Obj 5, 6

Productivity Obj 7

Economic Systems Obj 8

Economic Institutions and Incentives Obj 9 - 13

Exchange, Money and Interdependence Obj 14-19

Markets and Prices Obj 20

Supply and Demand Obj 21 

Competition and Market Structure Obj 22

The Role of Government Obj 23

Unemployment (Optional Obj 24 - 26

Absolute and Comparative Advantage and Barriers to Trade Obj 27

 

Objectives:

The student will understand:

  1. Scarcity results from the imbalance between relatively unlimited wants and limited resources.
  2. Like individuals, governments and societies experience scarcity because their productive resources are limited and their wants are virtually unlimited.
  3. Entrepreneurship refers to the human resources that assume the risk of organizing other resources to produce goods and services.
  4. Because federal, state and local governments have limited budgets, they must compare their revenues to the costs of public projects their citizens desire.
  5. When resources are used to produce a particular good or a service, the opportunity cost is not being able to produce the next most valued alternative.
  6. Few choices are all-or-nothing propositions; they usually involve trade-offs, i.e., getting a little more of one option in exchange for a little less of something else.
  7. The level of output in an economy can be increased through specialization.
  8. The United States economy is organized around a system of private markets in which prices for goods and services are determined.
  9. Households are individuals or family units which, as consumers, buy goods and services from firms and , as resource owners, sell productive resources to firms.
  10. Profit-seeking firms are the basic production units in a market economy.
  11. Profit is the difference between revenues and the cost entailed in producing or selling a good or service; it is a return for risk-taking.
  12. The hope of earning profit motivates business firms to incur the risk involved in producing goods and services for the market.
  13. To earn income, households own and sell productive resources in a market economy and also lend money to people or firms.
  14. Money is a generally accepted medium of exchange.
  15. Money eliminated the need for the “double coincidence of wants.”
  16. Exchanges made through barter face problems of divisibility, portability and storage that are reduced by the use of money.
  17. Money has generally replaced barter as a more efficient system of exchange.
  18. Banks play a key role in providing currency and other forms of money to consumers, and serve as intermediaries between savers and borrowers.
  19. Greater specialization leads to increasing interdependence between producers and consumers.
  20. The market clearing or equilibrium price is the one price level at which quantity supplied equals quantity demanded.
  21. If the price of a product increases, quantity demanded will decrease and quantity supplied will increase.  If the price of the product decreases, quantity demanded will increase and quantity supplied will decrease.
  22. The level of competition in a market is largely determined by the number of buyers and sellers in a market.
  23. The government pays for the goods and services it produces through taxes and borrowing.
  24. Unemployed people are those who are willing and able to work at current wage rates, but do not have jobs.  (Optional)
  25. People who are unemployed usually have less income to buy goods and services than those who have jobs.  (Optional)
  26. Governments provide income to some unemployed workers until they can find jobs.  (Optional)
  27. The quantity and quality of productive resources available in different nations vary widely.
  28. The student will be able to verbalize the meanings of appropriate economic terms.

 

Basic Text:  Dollar Power, Thomas Johnson

 

  • The fifth grade classes met twice weekly for 45 minutes for the entire year.
  • This class had inherited a ceramic business from the previous fifth grade.  Due to production standards, quality control and pricing the company was operating at a loss.
  • This class was fortune to have as a consultant, a retired elderly gentleman who was knowledgeable in ceramics.  He spent one day weekly supervising production.  The students were able to make him feel that he was an important part of their business, as he was, and he aided them.
  • The class was able to recover the cost of their raw materials by a sale at Christmas.  They worked all second term stockpiling for a big sale in September.
  • Although the financial picture for Bisque Disc is still not rosy, it looks much better than a year ago.
  • Because of the high production up until January during the second term, the students started to use the Johnson text one class period a week.  This class period helped to clarify some of the questions they had related to their business venture.
  • This fifth grade left a stockpile of items ready for the next class, and they are eager to advice them as consultants.

 

 

Films

 

Mrs. Peabody’s Beach

If the Fegi Fits

Walt Disney Educational Media Co., Glendale CA.

 

Books:

 

The Child’s World of Choices

Donald Davison and John Kilgore

Iowa City, University of Iowa,  1975

 

Strategies for Teaching Economics, Intermediate Level (Grades 4-6)

Marilyn Kourlisky, Joint Council on Economic Education  1978

Ask Dr. Susan