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Teen Dating Violence

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What is dating violence?

Teen dating violence is the act or threat of violence by one member of an unmarried couple on the other member within a dating relationship. This includes any form of sexual, physical, and/or verbal or emotional abuse.

Take the test: warning signs of abuse

The excitement of being in a relationship can stop you from seeing the warning signs of abuse. Remember – you don’t have to have broken bones or a black eye to be abused. If you check more than two below, you may want to get help now before it’s too late.

Are you going out with someone who…

Is jealous and possessive toward you, checks up on you, belittles you in front of family and friends?

Won’t accept that you are breaking up with him/her?

Tries to control you, doesn’t like you being with friends, makes all the decisions, and doesn’t take your opinion seriously?

Scares you by his/her reactions to things you say or do? Threatens you with using weapons?

Is violent, has a history of fighting or losing his/her temper, and brags about mistreating others? Destroys or damages your personal property?

Forces you to have sex or is aggressive during sex? Pressures you to have unsafe sex? Thinks women or girls are sex objects? Attempts to manipulate you or becomes too serious about the relationship too quickly?

Uses drugs or alcohol and tries to get you to take them too?

Has a history of bad relationships or blames you when he or she mistreats you?

Hits, chokes, punches, kicks, slaps, pulls your hair, or physically hurts you?

Has caused your family and friends to express concern for your safety?

Did you know..

22 percent of high school students report nonsexual dating violence.[1]

More than 70 percent of pregnant teens or female teen parents are beaten by their boyfriends1

Nearly one in five teenage girls who have been in a relationship report a boyfriend had threatened violence toward her or threatened to injure himself over a breakup.[2]

One in three teens will experience abuse in a dating relationship.[3]

More than 23 percent of teens in violent dating relationships will never report it.3

One out of 11 teens report being the victim of physical abuse each year.[4]

10.2 percent of Ohio high school students reported having been “physically forced to have sexual intercourse.”[5]

One in three teenagers report knowing a friend or peer who has been hit, punched, kicked, slapped, choked, or physically hurt by their partner.[6]

What to do when the relationship ends…

Talk with your parents and friends about what you are going through so they can support and look out for you.

Keep spare change or a cell phone handy. In case of emergency, call 911 or your local police department.

Talk to your school counselors and seek their assistance. They can help change your class schedule, if necessary.

Avoid being alone at school and walking home alone.

Set up a buddy system for when you go places.

Remember

Violence is not a normal part of any relationship

Abuse is not your fault.

Reach out for help – it is available.

For more information on teen dating violence, go to www.ocjs.ohio.gov

Family Violence Prevention Center

Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services

Phone: 614-466-7782
Toll-free: 888-448-4842
Emial: fvpc@ocjs.ohio.gov
www.ocs.ohio.gov

The opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do necessarily reflect the view of the Department of Justice. This project was supported by Award No. 2006-JG-BO1-V7239 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justices, and administered by the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services.

Ohio Department of Public Safety
Education * Service * Prote



[1] Dancy, Denise O. “Dating Violence in Adolescence.” Family Violence Forum, Vol. 2. No. 4 National Center for State Courts, Winter 2003

[2] Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teen Research unlimited, February 2005.

[3] 2007 Break the Cycle

[4] Choose Respect 2009

[5] 2007 Ohio Youth Risk Behavior Survey

[6] 2007 Love is Not Abuse

Ask Dr. Susan